Promoting Deep Cuts from the Edge of Never

I'm terrible at promoting myself so, I've promised myself I'm going to knuckle down and put in the effort no matter how much it makes me cringe.

So here's the deal, Christmas is coming, and I know for a fact that my books are pretty entertaining. I'm biased but, I have it on reliable authority from some of my fanbase that my second book ended spectacularly. So if you pick up either one of my books, I promise you a good time. Let's go over the reasons why you might be on the fence.

1) I heard your book was about zombies, right? I'm not into zombies.

Yes but, they are something more. I feel like that genre is overplayed and stagnated a bit that's why I've changed the recipe. Some folks see zombies as a metaphor for consumerism because it spreads and grows and we could wind up destroying ourselves with it. My zombies are a metaphor for terrorism. They're darker, more sinister things and in my series people either hide from them and lock themselves away from the world or they run out to face it, guns blazing.

2) Is it true it isn't traditional horror?

No. It isn't traditional horror. Growing up I read a lot of fantasy and these days I read a lot of sci-fi, some of my favorite writers were Tim Powers, Anne McCaffrey, and Neal Stephenson. I use many perspectives when telling a story. It is a somewhat familiar fantasy-style of writing. This lets me start a lot of scenes with some intense action. I like to write that way because in my head I see things in either movie scenes or comic panel layouts. I can't help that.

3) It's apocalyptic fiction. Is it gritty? I hate gritty.

Nope. I mean there are times where it's painful because characters need reasons to grow, but I served in the army, and I can't stand when stories get that dark and gritty. The one thing I learned from the military is: no matter how sinister shit gets or how hard your day is, you still wind up laughing. It's difficult to explain unless someone has been that close to a life like this, but you feel more alive, and you laugh harder than you ever have. The people you go on these kinds of adventures with become closer family than you have ever known. There is good comedy found in my story because when you tossed in a situation where you could suddenly wind up dead, you find yourself living that much harder, trying to squeeze more magic and life out of every moment. Trust me.

4) So then is there too many laughs? Is it cheesy?

I don't think so. When I set out to write a story, I try to do three significant things: Take very flawed characters and get the reader to fall in love with them, give the reader a big adventure and help the reader grow alongside the characters. I think I do this well.

5) What's up with all the art and music in your stories? I mean there's actual art history facts in book two.

Yea, music is a mystical thing in my life, so I've turned it into a mystical element in my books. One of the characters is loosely based on me, and I have an obsession with art history, mostly modern art, so it's his driving force of insanity in an apocalypse. Both will be a reoccurring theme throughout the series because I don't know how to escape these things in my life.

6) You sound kind of insane. Is it true these stories came from nightmares of yours?

Yes. The origin stories of the characters for book one and book two both came from nightmares. Creepy, exciting, fun, horror-filled dreams that left me gasping and cheering when I woke up.

7) I'm still on the fence.

Okay, fair enough. My first book is in ebook form on Amazon, selling for $0.69 cents. That was about the lowest I could mark it without giving it away. I'd say try to read about 2 to 3 chapters. If you don't feel like reading more after that, I understand. The only guarantee I give you with my books is my story is a wild ride that won't work out how you think it will. It won't be a typical, chasing a can of beans, zombie adventure.

Book one is available on Amazon here: Goodbye from the Edge of Never
If you've already read it, you can pick up book two here: Deep Cuts from the Edge of never